religious communities

A Necessary Step? Examining Religious Freedom and Counterterrorism

Governments pursue counterterrorism policies that restrict religious rights in the misguided belief that effectively combatting terrorism requires the limiting or suspending of freedoms like religious liberty.

History teaches, and many studies confirm, that religiously restrictive counterterrorism policies which discriminate against entire religious groups work at cross purposes with the desired goal of effectively combatting terrorism.

Permanent Link: https://www.religiousfreedominstitute.org/cornerstone/2017/6/27/a-necessary-step-examining-religious-freedom-and-counterterrorism

Conscience and Community: Understanding the Freedom of Religion

By: Richard Garnett

“Religion,” said Justice William Douglas in his Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) opinion, is “an individual experience.” The opinion was a partial dissent, and this statement is partially correct. But, it does not tell the entire story. Many “religious experiences” are those of monks, mystics, and prophets—and of salesmen, coaches, teachers, and cops. But, many are also of peoples and tribes and congregations. As Justice Douglas’s colleague, Justice William Brennan, insisted in Corporation of the Presiding Bishop v. Amos (1987), “[f]or many individuals, religious activity derives meaning in large measure from participation in a larger religious community. Such a community represents an ongoing tradition of shared beliefs, an organic entity not reducible to a mere aggregation of individuals.” 

Permanent Link: https://www.religiousfreedominstitute.org/cornerstone/2016/6/30/conscience-and-community-understanding-the-freedom-of-religion